Band Portrait: The Archives

The Archives is an old-school, serious Reggae band with an album that will be released soon by ESL Music.

Good band portraits are as varied as other types of photography – there are no hard and fast rules (as Jay Dickman often says, “It depends!”).  I think this one works reasonably well because the band looks interesting and serious, and the background has character but isn’t distracting or modern.   The color version was good, but black and white is more old-school.

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Chuck Brown, R.I.P.

The Godfather of Go Go, a Washington, D.C., legend.   The beat will go on.  He was a joy to shoot.  These are three recent favorites – celebrations of his last birthday (8 months ago):

at the Capitol (obviously!):

Chuck Brown - Labor Day concert with National Symphony Orchestra at the U.S. Capitol; Steven Reineke, conductor

Chuck Brown - Labor Day concert with National Symphony Orchestra at the U.S. Capitol; Steven Reineke, conductor

and at D.C.’s 9:30 Club:

                                                          

(for some more photos of Chuck, see this gallery)

The Hamilton

Recently, I shot for the first time at The Hamilton, a new restaurant and separate live music venue in downtown, Washington, DC.(near the White House).   Food is also served in the music venue, which features table service, a balcony with a bar, a small dance floor, great sound, great lighting, and great sight lines.  It’s elegant space, right down to the walls, all covered with amazing, large black and white music photographs; it could be a gallery exhibit.

Empresarios:

Alma Tropicalia:

The Hirshhorn Surprises Again

Speaking of Hirshhorn surprises, after sunset the exterior becomes a video screen, with eleven high def projectors displaying the “the first-ever work of 360-degree convex-screen cinema”.  It’s Doug Aitken’s SONG 1, which you can see and hear until 13 May (after which it enters the museum’s permanent collection, whatever that means).   The soundtrack is a seamless, haunting mashup of the 1934 standard “I Only Have Eyes for You”, which Aitken produced from dozens of versions he commissioned from stylistically diverse musicians.   It’s a treat, and fun to shoot.

Doug Aitken: SONG 1 - For nearly eight weeks this spring, internationally renowned artist Doug Aitken (American, b. Redondo Beach, California, 1968; lives and works in Los Angeles and New York) will illuminate the entire facade of the Hirshhorn’s iconic building, transforming it into “liquid architecture” and an urban soundscape. Using eleven high-definition video projectors, Aitken will seamlessly blend imagery to envelop the Museum's exterior, creating a work that redefines cinematic space. A bold commission that will enter the Hirshhorn's permanent collection and enliven its public space, "SONG 1" allows visitors to the National Mall a chance to witness the first-ever work of 360-degree convex-screen cinema.

Doug Aitken: SONG 1 - For nearly eight weeks this spring, internationally renowned artist Doug Aitken (American, b. Redondo Beach, California, 1968; lives and works in Los Angeles and New York) will illuminate the entire facade of the Hirshhorn’s iconic building, transforming it into “liquid architecture” and an urban soundscape. Using eleven high-definition video projectors, Aitken will seamlessly blend imagery to envelop the Museum's exterior, creating a work that redefines cinematic space. A bold commission that will enter the Hirshhorn's permanent collection and enliven its public space, "SONG 1" allows visitors to the National Mall a chance to witness the first-ever work of 360-degree convex-screen cinema.      Doug Aitken: SONG 1 - For nearly eight weeks this spring, internationally renowned artist Doug Aitken (American, b. Redondo Beach, California, 1968; lives and works in Los Angeles and New York) will illuminate the entire facade of the Hirshhorn’s iconic building, transforming it into “liquid architecture” and an urban soundscape. Using eleven high-definition video projectors, Aitken will seamlessly blend imagery to envelop the Museum's exterior, creating a work that redefines cinematic space. A bold commission that will enter the Hirshhorn's permanent collection and enliven its public space, "SONG 1" allows visitors to the National Mall a chance to witness the first-ever work of 360-degree convex-screen cinema.